Quotes of the Week

May 1st, 2010 § 1 comment

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Victor Davis Hanson:

On the unfortunate matter of “presenting papers”: I have done that numerous times this year — boarding airplanes, purchasing things on a credit card, checking into a hotel, showing a doorman an I.D. when locked out, going to the DMV, and, in one case, pulling off a rural road to use my cell phone in a way that alarmed a chance highway patrolman. An I.D. check to allay “reasonable suspicion” or “probable cause” is very American.

Rasmussen Reports:

Eighty-three percent (83%) of Americans say the size of the federal budget deficit is due more to the unwillingness of politicians to cut government spending than to the reluctance of taxpayers to pay more in taxes.

Mark Steyn  Bigotry label for thee, not me:

As I write, I have my papers on me – and not just because I’m in Arizona. I’m an immigrant, and it is a condition of my admission to this great land that I carry documentary proof of my residency status with me at all times and be prepared to produce it to law enforcement officials, whether on a business trip to Tucson or taking a stroll in the woods back at my pad in New Hampshire.

Who would impose such an outrageous Nazi fascist discriminatory law?

Er, well, that would be Franklin Roosevelt.

Zombie:

Muslims have for centuries threatened to kill anyone who draws Mohammed; it’s only that now, since 9/11, we in the West are aware of the threats. Before, the warnings and prohibitions were distant bleats which didn’t scare those few artists who even heard them. But with 9/11, the murder of Theo van Gogh, the fatwas against and attempted murders of the Danish cartoonists, and global riots over the mildest of caricatures, the atmosphere has changed: Suddenly, the threats by Muslims are widely publicized and feel quite real indeed.

James Taranto interviews Emmett Tyrell Jr.

Mr. Tyrrell finds liberals’ attitudes to be as vexing as their policies: “There is only one political value that they have stood by through three generations, and that is the political value of disturbing your neighbor.” If conservatism is a temperament, he adds, “liberalism is an anxiety—an anxiety about life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, which explains their eagerness to coerce, to tax, to social-engineer.”

Conservatives, by contrast, “react against coercion.” Mr. Tyrrell agrees with activist Grover Norquist’s “wonderful” description of the conservative movement as the “leave-us-alone coalition.” “That doesn’t mean we just want to be left alone to live in some sort of onanistic trance,” he says. “We want to be left alone so that we can take delight in culture, take delight in our farms, take delight in our families, our churches, our lack of churches—whatever.”

Ezra Klein (Progressive Reporter for the Washington Post)

I don’t think the Democrats are going to like me calling this a biometric national ID card, as they go to great lengths to say that it is not a national ID card, and make it “unlawful for any person, corporation; organization local, state, or federal law enforcement officer; local or state government; or any other entity to require or even ask an individual cardholder to produce their social security card for any purpose other than electronic verification of employment eligibility and verification of identity for Social Security Administration purposes.”

President Obama:

I Do Think at Some Point You’ve Made Enough Money.

Fredrich von Hayek

Even more significant of the inherent weakness of the collectivist theories is the extraordinary paradox that from the assertion that society is in some sense more than merely the aggregate of all individuals their adherents regularly pass by a sort of intellectual somersault to the thesis that in order that the coherence of this larger entity be safeguarded it must be subjected to conscious control, that is, to the control of what in the last resort must be an individual mind. It thus comes about that in practice it is regularly the theoretical collectivist who extols individual reason and demands that all forces of society be made subject to the direction of a single mastermind, while it is the individualist who recognizes the limitations of the powers of individual reason and consequently advocates freedom as a means for the fullest development of the powers of the interindividual process. 

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